Posts Tagged ‘rap’

This coming Friday at 9pm, the Oly Music Awards is putting on a  pre-show to help showcase some good local bands. If you’re interested in local music, then this isn’t an event you want to miss. At some point after the pre-show, there will be an award ceremony to honor local bands. See more info at OlyMusicAwards.com

Line-up is as follows:

From what I’ve listened to of “Fight for Change” and “Elbow Coulee”, I would very much enjoy seeing them live. As for “Jabi Shriki”, well… he’s not exactly my genre. I had trouble finding information about the band “Point Process” online, but if I find out about the genre or find a sample of their work then I will go back and post it here. In the meantime if you know something about Point Process or any of these other bands, then please tell us.

(Print it out and share it around)

^ Look at all of those sponsors! I’m hoping to make it to this event, however if I don’t then perhaps one of our other writers would be willing to write a little blurb about it.

About the venue: I’m a big fan of Le Voyeur Cafe. Though I’m not a vegan or vegetarian, I still enjoy stopping by for a tasty sandwich when I’m out and about. The cafe also doubles as a venue for all kinds of music (except metal…not to say that they exclude metal, I’ve just never seen it there). Expect a slightly intimate show because the venue space is kind of small. Most of the shows I’ve seen at Le Voyeur have been rap, hip-hop, or electronica, so this should be a treat.

P.S. If you’re looking for something to do the day after this event, why not check out the Free Radio Olympia Valentine’s All You Can Eat Event.

~Darion

To some people this may seem mind blowing, but there was actually a time when hip-hop artists and punk bands would hang out, maybe even play shows together. Starting in the late 70s and early 80s, there was a time when the rebellious, political sentiments of the two genres actually lead to a surprising amount of collaboration and acknowledgment between artists.  Just for example, the  Beastie Boys became hip hop icons after originally starting as a hardcore punk band way back in 1982.  For a much better article on the early underground coexistence of the two genres check the blog located here. I doubt anyone rapped over sampled hardcore bands, but the idea of the two being in the same scene isn’t nearly as impossible as it would seem today.

Today if you were to go to a local show anywhere (or at least here in the northwest) you probably would not find Hip Hop artists and punks playing the same venue. What caused this rift? Most likley the gross assimilation of the two genres into mainstream culture. I’m sure things are far more complicated than this, but its undeniable that mainstream hip-hop‘s constant references to money being synonymous with greatness doesn’t fit with punk anymore than hip-hop would fit with the now seemingly nonexistent (perhaps somehow replaced by dubstep?) scene of whatever emo was. Likewise is the case with the underground, at least here in the Northwest. I don’t pretend to know everything, but as far as I know the Boom Bap Project playing a show with Rvivr still seems a little far fetched.

Meanwhile deep in the last ten(ish) years of California…

Somewhere in the strange limbo of artists of the California not-quite-mainstream-but-still-not-considered-underground-cus’-their-kinda’-well-known scene, there has been birthed some collaboration between punk and hip-hop artists (i.e Tim Armstrong being featured by Cypress hill here). Most of these collaborations are artists simply writing in another genre, but sometimes include a little experimental genre mixing. Notably a famous shampoo commercial jingle by The Transplants (Once again, still including Tim Armstrong, my apologies to the California Hip Hop Punks for not knowing anybody else).  Still, there are other artists who are not quite changing genres at all; but instead just giving shouts outs and playing basically the same stuff (shit, if you will). Say whatever you will (“no” for example, could be something you’d say) about many of these collaborations or whatever-they-are, at least it seems that they don’t do any real mixing of hardcore punk rock and hip-hop to make one  new weird-ass genre…

Or do they?!

Indeed, ass-whole cynicism aside; there are actually examples of Hip-Hop Punk Rock that in my opinion actually work (in the sense it blends both genres without sounding artificial, forced, or in general: terrible). So here are three very different songs by three very different artists all writing songs that blend punk and hip hop in three very different ways:

Zion I – Amerika

Extremely political. Probably the song that really blends the two genres the most, although be it with a higher emphasis on hip-hop. Listen to the whole thing before you rush to your own cynical judgments.

Leftover Crack – So you wanna be a cop

Leftover Crack, Chocking Victim, Crack Rock Steady Seven, Morning Glory; aren’t they all the exact same fucking band? Not really, but almost. Stza has been the front man and songwriter for pretty much all of them except Morning Glory (although he is still featured on some songs). I met Stza when Starfucking Hipsters were touring in 2009, during the ancient time when we actually booked shows in Olympia. I once heard a drunken rant from Stza claiming that they’ve actually played under a lot of different names in New York, due to constantly being banned from venues.  No idea if that’s true, but regardless! This song goes from old school breakdown to punk chorus, smoothly. I mean really, it works pretty well.

The Have Nots – Secret Machines ft. Cathy Cathotic

OK, so this is literally just a ska punk song until you get around 2:05.  The Have Nots are not exactly the most original thing to happen in 2011; a ska-punk + shout-talk (almost rap?) vocals reminiscent of Jessie Micheals (Op Ivy & Common Rider) + little bit of a pop-punk sound = not really breaking news. I like them, they played quite possibly one of the worst shows I’ve ever thrown in Olympia, and they came all the way from Boston! The lyrics in the chorus of this song feel a little lame to me, but its catchy as fuck. So here yo go, enjoy the sound of a Boston MC rapping over a ska punk break down, because apparently, that happens in Boston.

Finally-

-if you haven’t caught on by now I’m not exactly a Transplants fan (which is ironic, because the first show I ever chipped a tooth at was Rancid). But this is pretty goddamn badass:

Andrew

If you are anything like me, then the chances are you appreciate a good cartoon. I grew up on a variety of great cartoons, one of which was Dexter’s Laboratory; a show that will always remain in my personal top five animated series.

Let’s start with some quick background info:

Dexter’s Lab was the creation of the amazing animator named Genndy Tartakovsky (Notable for creating Samurai Jack as well as  many other awesome cartoons). The show was originally cancelled in 1998 after only two seasons, though the popularity of the re-runs caused a revival of the show in 2001 with two more season before finally being cancelled permanently.

Most unexpected album I've ever found.

It was during this revival that magic happened. In 2002 , Warner Bros Records released an album titled Dexter’s Laboratory: The Hip Hop Experiment  as a promotional tool for both the network and the show it’s self. Cartoon Network had been trying to push music into their programming at the time (I would speculate that the album was also a “fair-well” to this beloved series which was cancelled soon after). The album was a compilation of six Hip-Hop songs inspired by the show, written and performed by various famous artist at the time. This type of music project isn’t completely unheard of. The Aquabats (and many many other bands) have been featured on shows like Yo Gabba Gabba, Sesame Street had some big name performances aswell, and I’ve even seen promos for cartoon shows by artists like The Violent Femmes and They Might Be Giants; but it’s not every day that you see a compilation of songs by multiple artists about one specific show.

Since this particular compilation is about a cartoon show targeted at children, the songs remain relatively clean in lyrics, (I swear I heard reference to smoking chronic) but there’s nothing wrong with that. For some reason the overall concept of this album blows my mind, here we have famous hip-hop artists like Will.i.am and De La Soul writing catchy songs about a red-headed boy genius. Most of the tracks on this album are highly repetitive and I have a sneaking suspicion that the artist didn’t put all of their effort into writing these lyrics. Despite all of this, the songs remain damn-catchy (especially “Secrets” by Will.i.am) and given the target audience, I don’t blame them for not writing epic hip-hop ballads. Dexter’s Laboratory: The Hip-Hop Experiment is a great album if you’re a fan of the show and are looking for some nostalgia,  if want to annoy your friends with useless trivia, or want to experience a “what the fuck?” moment. If you ever find yourself in any of these circumstances, then look to this album.

Note: This album might actually be more “obscure” than I thought. Contributions to this project are not mentioned on any of the artist’s discography or Wikipedia pages. Furthermore, I could only find two tracks that could be heard online, the rest have to be downloaded from a few specific sites that for one reason or another happen to have a copy. This being the case, I have taken the liberty of posting the songs below for your listening pleasure:

Dexter’s Lab Theme  

Secrets -Will.i.am  

Dexter (What’s his name?) – Coolio  

Love According to Dexter- Phiphe Dawg feat. Slick & Rose  

Sibling Rivalries- De La Soul  

Mandark’s Plan- YZ

Back to the Lab- Prince Paul  

~Darion  

 

Update: I found this freestyle rap a while ago, I think it belongs in this post: